Nyack Hospital’s “Prevent Type 2” Program Aims to Lower Diabetes Risk


Nyack Hospital’s “Prevent Type 2” Program Aims to Lower Diabetes Risk

March 22, 2017: Tuesday, March 28th is Diabetes Alert Day and Nyack Hospital invites community members to meet with our Certified Diabetes Educators who will be in the hospital lobby from 10:30 a.m. – 2:30 p.m., to answer questions and share valuable information about the disease. Diabetes is the seventh leading cause of death in the United States. Today, 1 in 10 adults in the U.S. has diabetes, and if trends continue, 1 in 5 will have it by 2025. The American Diabetes Association offers a free and anonymous online Type 2 Diabetes Risk Test to help you determine your risk. If you get a high score that indicates you may have prediabetes, talk with your doctor who will do a simple blood test to check your blood sugar levels.

If you have been diagnosed with prediabetes or are at risk of diabetes, you can learn how to prevent or delay developing diabetes through Nyack Hospital’s “Prevent Type 2” program. Participants learn to improve their food choices, increase physical activity, and learn coping skills to maintain weight loss to help prevent developing type 2 diabetes.

The program runs for an hour once a week for 16 weeks, and then once a month for up to a year. There is no fee to participate and classes are taught by Denise Roma, MS, RDN, CDN, CDE, Community Health Educator at Nyack Hospital. For information about Nyack Hospital’s Prevent Type 2 Program, call 845-348-2004.     

There are 86 million adults in the U.S. (1 in 3), who have prediabetes, which means their blood sugar is higher than normal, but not high enough to be considered type 2 diabetes. Without intervention, 15% to 30% of people with prediabetes will develop type 2 diabetes within five years which puts them at risk of serious health problems, including heart attack, stroke, blindness, kidney failure and loss of toes, feet or legs.

The Nyack Hospital class is part of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s (CDC) Diabetes Prevention Program. CDC-recognized lifestyle change programs are proven to work. They are based on research that showed people with prediabetes who take part in a structured lifestyle change program can cut their risk of developing type 2 diabetes by 58% (71% for people over 60 years old).

This finding was the results of the program helping people lose 5% to 7% of their body weight through healthier eating and 150 minutes of physical activity a week. For a person who weighs 200 pounds, losing 5% to 7% of their body weight means losing 10 to 14 pounds. It doesn’t take a drastic weight loss to make a big impact. And the impact of this program can last for years to come. Research has found that even after 10 years, people who completed a diabetes prevention lifestyle change program were one third less likely to develop type 2 diabetes.